Camp Abilities is a sports camp for kids with visual impairments.
Camp Abilities is a sports camp for kids with visual impairments.
Camp Abilities is a sports camp for kids with visual impairments.
Camp Abilities is a sports camp for kids with visual impairments.
previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

“I Can Play!”

~ Braden, age 10


Strong. Determined. Fearless. And Empowered. At Camp Abilities all around the world, children who are visually impaired embrace these descriptions. Camp Abilities is not just a week at camp. It’s a lifetime of believing in yourself.

Please take thirteen minutes of your time to watch Soledad O’Brien with Real Sports HBO to experience the beauty of Camp Abilities. In just 13 minutes, you’ll see children’s lives change right before your very own eyes.

The opportunity to develop friendships – true, lasting, rewarding friendships- is priceless.

“They told me they were best friends. I asked how long they had known each other. They answered ‘Since Friday’”

~ Dr. Lauren Lieberman at Camp Abilities Long Island


When a child is visually impaired or blind, finding friends can be difficult. Adding to their sense of isolation, oftentimes these children are the only visually impaired students in their schools. Too many campers arrive at camp having spent years facing down bullies.

The opportunity to develop friendships – true, lasting, rewarding friendships- is priceless.

 

“No one at camp ever told me I couldn’t do it.”

~ Quinn Birch, a camper


Every Camp Abilities camper is provided ONE-ON-ONE instruction and support so they can reach their potential. Every camper/athlete has a counselor/coach standing next to him – a side-by-side support system, a cheerleader, a confidant.

Someone who wants the camper to succeed as much – or more – than the camper himself.

 

The best advocate for the child is the child himself.”

~ Dr. Lauren Lieberman


One of the most important and unique initiatives at Camp Abilities is Self-Advocacy. Camp Abilities teaches the campers how to find and use their voices.

They are encouraged to have goals, taught how to communicate their needs and identify available resources. They prepare scripts and practice asking for inclusion.

Most importantly, they are taught that THEIR NEEDS and THEIR VOICES MATTER

 
  • Sign up to get notifications when new Blogs are released!

  • Contact Us